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Christian Spirituality

A overview of library resources for the study of Christian Spirituality

Library Electronic Resources

Reference - Electronic Sources

Electronic Books

Oxford Early Christian Studies series

  • Gregory of Nyssa's Doctrinal Works : A Literary Study
    • Gregory of Nyssa's Doctrinal Works presents a reading of the works in Gregory's corpus devoted to the dogmatic controversies of his day. Andrew Radde-Gallwitz focuses as much on Gregory the writer as on Gregory the dogmatic theologian. He sets both elements not only within the context of imperial legislation and church councils of Gregory's day, but also within their proper religious context-that is, within the temporal rhythms of ritual and sacramental practice.
  • Isaac of Nineveh's Ascetical Eschatology
    • This volume discusses the development of Isaac of Nineveh's eschatology through an examination of his use of Syriac source material "Isaac of Nineveh's Ascetical Eschatology demonstrates that Isaac's eschatology is an original synthesis based on ideas garnered from a distinctively Syriac cultural milieu. Jason Scully investigates six sources relevant to the study of Isaac's Syriac source material and cultural heritage. These include ideas adapted from Syriac authors like Ephrem, John the Solitary, and Narsai, but also adapted from the Syriac versions of texts originally written in Greek, like Evagrius's Gnostic Chapters, Pseudo-Dionysius's Mystical Theology, and the Pseudo-Macarian homilies. Isaac's eschatological synthesis of this material is a sophisticated discourse on the psychological transformation that occurs when the mind has an experience of God. It begins with the premise that asceticism was part of God's original plan for creation. Isaac says that God created human beings with infantile knowledge and that God intended from the beginning for Adam and Eve to leave the Garden of Eden. Once outside the garden, human beings would have to pursue mature knowledge through bodily asceticism.
  • Liturgy and Byzantinization in Jerusalem
    • This book examines the way Christians in Jerusalem prayed and how their prayer changed in the face of foreign invasions and the destruction of their places of worship. Originally, Byzantium's worship consisted of reading scripture and singing hymns at places connected with the life of Christ, so that the link between holy sites and liturgy became a hallmark of Jerusalem's worship, but the changing sacred topography led to changes in the local liturgical tradition. 'Liturgy and Byzantinization in Jerusalem' is the first study dedicated to the question of the Byzantinization of Jerusalem's liturgy, providing English translations of many liturgical texts and hymns here for the first time and offering a glimpse of Jerusalem's lost liturgical and theological tradition.
  • The Theological Anthropology of Eustathius of Antioch
    • This study offers insight into one of the most important thinkers of the early Arian controversy. Sophie Cartwright situates Eustathius' thought in relation to the early 'Arian' controversy, the Constaninian Revolution, the theological legacies of Irenaeus and Origen, and the philosophical commentary tradition. She also locates Eustathius within his historical context and provides a detailed overview of the sources for his complex and fragmented corpus. Eustathius' anthropology is indebted to a tradition shaped by the theology of Irenaeus, that had already come into conversation with Origen. Dr Cartwright suggests that Origen's own thought was indebted to Irenaeus but that he had a radically different cosmology; this shaped subsequent engagement with both thinkers. Eustathius' theology of embodiment draws on Irenaeus, in opposition to what he perceives as the Origenist and Platonist anthropology which, in his anti-Arian works, he associates with Eusebius of Caesarea. However, he is deeply indebted to Origen for his doctrine of Christ's human soul and, consequently, his wider psychology

Internet Resources